Admittedly, I was mildly shocked and a bit scared when stumbling over @ZackMaril’s recent tweet claiming Clojure was a dying language. A huge discussion was sparked and a lot has been written since. A summary can be found in Arne Brasseur’s post which also offers some good insight into the community behind Clojure. Eric Normand added another layer of abstraction today and collected some more links in this week’s Drama edition of the purelyfunctional.tv newsletter.

I share Dan Lebrero’s sentiment on Clojure. Clojure taught me lessons and introduced concepts to me  that I do not want to miss any more. First and foremost I love the built-in immutable collections. Immutability as default is a milestone in my life as a developer. I compare it to git, pair-programming, continuous integration and IntelliJ IDEA (with Cursive now, of course). There was a time when I did not even know about each of these. Now I cannot imagine to ever work without any of them.

In this post I want to emphasize another not less important aspect: Productivity. With Clojure we get a whole lot of stuff done. Seriously.

This is part two of my roundup of  EuroClojure 2014. If you missed the first part, find it here.

Day two started with the keynote by David Nolen about Invention, Innovation & ClojureScript. After some interesting discussion on the difference between invention and innovation, he talked about the history of clojurescript, a clojure implementation that does not target the jvm but javascript as a runtime environment. It was released 3 years ago and since then undergoes constant innovation. To date, the innovations come from 81 different contributors. Examples for contributed innovations are persistent immutable datastructures and source maps, which are very useful for debugging clojurescript. David introduced the basics on react.js and then of om. Om is a clojurescript library on top of react.js. It adds a key ingredient to react: Immutability. By having an immutable global application state, communication between components becomes feasible without any of those crazy interactions, that make classical user interface development so hard. As an example David  showed Goya, a pixel editor for the browser. Due to clojurescript’s persistent datastructures it features undo/redo of a virtually unlimited number of steps with little to no performance impact at all. David finished with an outlook on clojurescript 1.0. Among the goals is better code sharing between clojure and clojurescript.