Abstract

In the last two months, we started our journey towards a new microservices architecture. Among other things, we found that our existing CD tools were not ready to scale with new requirements. So we tried a new approach, defining our pipelines in code using LambdaCD. In combination with a Mesos cluster we can deploy new applications after a few minutes to see how they fit into our architecture by running tests against existing services.

Part 1: The underlying infrastructure
Part 2: Microservices and continuous integration
Part 3: Current architecture and vision for the future

In this part of my article I want to explain how we define microservices and why we think they are the best choice for our applications. Furthermore I will give you a brief introduction outlining which problems we have with common CI tools and how we want to solve them with LambdaCD.

A little more than a year ago, things at work were completely different for me than they are now. I was a Java programmer working on a big, monolithic piece of software. There was also some JavaScript for frontend and MongoDB, some Groovy for scripting Gradle and the occasional Bash script, but if you had called me a 100% Java programmer, I would not have objected. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoyed my job and I always loved to work with Java but as you may relate to, after years of hacking Java, I was a little tired of it. As you may also relate to, I had little hope for the situation to change significantly anytime soon. As it turned out, I was wrong about that. Hugely wrong.

Abstract

In the last two months, we started our journey towards a new microservices architecture. Among other things, we found that our existing CD tools were not ready to scale with those new requirements. So we tried a new approach, defining our pipelines in code using LambdaCD. In combination with a Mesos cluster we can deploy new applications after a few minutes to see how they fit into our architecture by running tests against existing services.

Part 1: The underlying infrastructure
Part 2: Microservices and continuous integration
Part 3: Current architecture and vision for the future